black voters

NAACP Research Finds Black Voters Far From Being a Monolith

The NAACP commissioned the leading millennial and minority-owned public opinion research company HIT Strategies to analyze Black voter engagement and explore trends and devise strategies to reach voters on the issues that they care about. They found that Black voters are far from being a monolith – though they have many similarities.

Haynes Moves Ministry from Pulpit to Streets to Political Suites

The Rev. Dr. Frederick Douglass Haynes III, the visionary pastor of the 12,000-member Friendship-West Baptist Church in Dallas, Texas, aims to keep Black achievements at the forefront of nation’s conscious, particularly in the area of voting rights.

President Issues Executive Orders on Voting on Anniversary of Bloody Sunday

“The right to vote is the foundation of American democracy. Free and fair elections that reflect the will of the American people must be protected and defended,” President Biden remarked during the Martin & Coretta Scott King Unity Breakfast. “But many Americans, especially people of color, confront significant obstacles to exercising that fundamental right. These obstacles include difficulties with voter registration, lack of election information, and barriers to access at polling places.”

U.S. House of Representatives Passes Milestone Voting and Ethics Legislation

House Resolution 1 – the “For the People Act of 2021” – counts as a strong rebuke and counterbalance to voting restrictions considered or enacted in various Republican-led states across the country. It restricts partisan gerrymandering of congressional districts and nullifies obstacles for voters.

Without Black Voters, the Campaign to Recall California Governor Newsom is Going to Fail

California Governor Gavin Newsom is no great friend to Black people in his state. He made it clear how he felt about us when he ignored the calls for him to keep a Black woman in the U.S. Senate by replacing outgoing Senator Kamala Harris with another Black woman. So the point at which Newsom and the Democratic Party establishment should really be worried about the efforts to recall him is if Black women decide to send a reminder to them both that they still need us.

Voter Suppression Tactics and Long Lines Fail to Quell Resolve of Black Voters

“Indiana has some incredibly restrictive voter laws, and currently we only have one early voting site in all of Indianapolis,” stated Robert Shegog, CEO at the Indianapolis Recorder Newspaper and Indiana Minority Business Magazine. “A few more will open Oct. 24, but significantly more are needed given the size of the city. However, it is very refreshing to see so many people voting early. This has been a trend in Indianapolis for over ten years now, and the numbers keep increasing,” Shegog noted.

LA Council Candidate Yoo Attacks Group That Mobilizes Black Voters

Trying to gain traction with her struggling campaign, LA City Council District 10 Candidate Grace Yoo has attacked the major voter registration project that her opponent, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, created to increase the number of Black voters over the last 20 years.

Trump Promises “Platinum Plan” for Black Americans

 In an attempt to win Black voters that have been elusive for the Republican Party for many cycles, President Donald Trump announced a “Platinum Plan,” of Black Economic Empowerment.

Trump unveiled the plan during an Atlanta rally with less than six weeks left until Election Day on November 3rd. Currently, President Barack Obama’s former Vice President Joe Biden in leading in the polls in many key states in the presidential contest. 

150 Years After Ratification of the 15th Amendment, Black Votes Are Still Contested: The Black fight for the franchise

“The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. The Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” So reads the 15th Amendment, ratified on February 3, 1870, the third of what came to be known as the Reconstruction amendments.