Saturday, May 25, 2019
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Marian Anderson
USC to Host Event Marking the 80th Anniversary of Marian Anderson’s Historic Lincoln Memorial Concert
March 22, 2019
Held in honor of the 80th anniversary of Marian Anderson’s historic concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial – often called “The Concert that Sparked the Civil Rights Movement” – and the generations of women who have and continue to fight for humanity, equity, and justice, the evening will feature an intimate conversation and performance exploring the legacy of music’s relationship to activism and social change. ... read more »
Our History Matters: The Untold Stories of African American ‘Hidden Figures’
February 8, 2019
Marshall Walter “Major” Taylor was born in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1878. Major Taylor participated in his first bike race as a teenager. Shortly after, he moved to Worcester, Massachusetts to become a professional cyclist. Throughout his career, he received several world records from competing in races around the world but that didn’t stop the racist fans from throwing things at him and competitors trying to bump him off the track during his races. One competitor by the name of W.E. Becker choked Taylor until the police separated the two. ... read more »
This Week In Black History (November 30 – December 6)
December 11, 2017
This Week In Black History (November 30 – December 6) ... read more / view gallery »
Child Watch: Recognizing All of America’s S/Heroes
April 28, 2016
Every day I wear a pair of medallions around my neck with portraits of two of my role models: Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth. As a child I read books about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. She and indomitable and eloquent slave woman Sojourner Truth represent countless thousands of anonymous slave women whose bodies and minds were abused and whose voices were muted by slavery, Jim Crow, segregation and confining gender roles throughout our nation’s history. Although Harriet Tubman could not read books, she could read the stars to find her way north to freedom. And she freed not only herself from slavery, but returned to slave country again and again through forests and streams and across mountains to lead other slaves to freedom at great personal danger. She was tough. She was determined. She was fearless. She was shrewd and she trusted God completely to deliver her, and other fleeing slaves, from pursuing captors who had placed a bounty on her life. ... read more »
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