Wednesday, July 15, 2020
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Study: African Americans Poorer Today Than Five Years Ago
March 12, 2020
“I don’t want to get political here, but I would hope that this report would color how people view the approaches that the parties and candidates take toward legislative and social issues, and how those things are framed,” Lending Tree Lead Researcher Kali McFadden told NNPA Newswire. ... read more »
Debt and Rising Home Costs Continue to Defer Homeownership
November 8, 2018
A decade has passed since the housing collapse.  In that time, bank profits are back and continue to rise. Despite occasional trading fluctuations, the stock market remains profitable for most investors. Then there’s the low rate of unemployment that is often cited as if economic strides have included nearly everyone. ... read more »
‘I Am The Blues’ A Journey To The Back Roads And Juke Joints Of The Deep South July 12 on VOD
July 13, 2017
“I Am The Blues,” directed by Daniel Cross, now available on VOD July 12th takes the viewer into the deep, back-roads of the South visiting the authentic juke joints and listening to the stories of the people who play, live and know the real roots of the blues. The blues is a musical style—absolutely—but it’s a life style above-and-beyond and many of those who were eyewitness to the height of the blues are now at an advanced age. Here is what “I Am the Blues” filmmaker Daniel Cross had to say about where to find the blues and why the blues are still hard to define. LA Sentinel (LAS): Where are the best “blues clubs” in L.A. and NYC?   Daniel Cross (DC): I don’t have a good answer for this - I wish that I did. I hope to find out. LAS; People often say that it’s very hard to define the blues or rather we all have our own version of the blues.  What’s your definition? DC: Blues is music that reflects on a person’s life: the joy, the misery the camaraderie. It is meant to be shared and [sang] to another person so the story can be shared and evolved.  LAS:  Will the blues and places like those featured in the film find a new life?  If so, how and where?  If not—why not? DC: The places in the film were old juke joints and do not operate on a true economic model; they are more labors of love, places of history that are passed down, and the operators/managers do it out of a sense of community and for the music.  Today, in my time spent there, I did not sense a consistent flow of young people who were showing true interest or doing the work to keep these places alive. Perhaps, if there is an economic model attached that makes keeping the juke joints more profitable, then there will be people more interested in keeping them open.  The way it looks to me, the old juke joints will find it hard to get a new life. However, there are still many blues bars that operate like clubs and do just fine.  ... read more »
History Detectives 
August 24, 2016
How many generations back can you trace your family lineage? Many people who consider themselves “native Angelenos” have a history that dates back to the South. ... read more »
ASPCA Positions Itself as a Resource in South L.A., Offers Free Services
August 27, 2015
While most of the news and information on the subject deals with the lack of healthy food options available in low-income environments, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Spay/Neuter Clinic has positioned itself as a community resource for local cat and dog owners. ... read more »
7 Black Churches set ablaze in the South
July 8, 2015
Seven predominantly Black churches in Southern States Tennessee, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia and North Carolina have gone into flames after the recent shooting in Charleston, South Carolina. ... read more »
Confederate Flag sales soar after South Carolina Church shooting
July 2, 2015
Rising conversations about the origin and history of the Confederate flag continues to be a topic on America’s list of issues for discussion. ... read more »
Legacy of slavery still impacts education in the South
June 24, 2015
Slavery was abolished more than 150 years ago, but its effects are still felt today in K-12 education in the South, according to a new Rice University study, "How the Legacy of Slavery and Racial Composition Shape Public School Enrollment in the American South." ... read more »
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