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Leah Chase… A New Orleans Culinary Icon & Lovely Lady
June 6, 2019
‘Queen of Creole Cuisine’ Passes Away at Age 96 “Life is about listening, learning and never giving up. As long as you’re here on earth, you’re here for a purpose and it’s not about you, it’s about what you can do to better the world you live in. And that’s why I’m here, to help someone else up.” That’s what New Orleans chef and civil rights icon, Leah Chase told the Sentinel in an exclusive interview in 2017. She has served notables such as Quincy Jones, Jesse Jackson, Thurgood Marshall, James Baldwin, Ray Charles, former President Barack Obama and many more. ... read more »
THERE NEVER WAS A NOBLE SOUTH.
May 24, 2019
Have you ever noticed that when driving through the southern United States you are hard-pressed to find a city or town without a memorial to the Confederate war dead, but you are equally hard-pressed to find a city or town with a monument commemorating fallen Revolutionary War soldiers? ... read more »
Hate Crimes and Solutions Offered by Activists
May 3, 2019
Phyllis G. Williams, the co-host of the podcast “Living the Principles,” said one reason hate crimes are increasing is that criminals of those actions typically gain notoriety. “Hate crimes with mass media exposure are nothing shy of a recruiting tool. This is why we have seen an increase over the last few years,” Williams said. ... read more »
Black Religious Groups, Non-Profits Can Apply for Security Grants as Gov Prioritizes Hate Crimes With $15M Emergency Fund
May 2, 2019
African American churches, mosques and other religious organizations are among vulnerable non-profits in California eligible to apply for security grants after Gov. Gavin Newsom approved $15 million in emergency funds this week to help religious and community-based groups protect themselves against hate crimes.  ... read more »
James Byrd’s Killer Didn’t Deserve the Death Penalty
May 2, 2019
Killing is wrong. Killing Black people because they are Black is even more wrong. Lynching Black people is exponentially wrong. So why was I opposed to the state-imposed killing of John William King, the despicable murderer of James Byrd, Jr.? I happen to think that there are worse things that can happen to you than death. The now 44-year old King could have gotten a sentence of life in prison and lived miserably there for the rest of his life. In some ways, death is salvation for him. Imagine being relatively healthy with nothing to look forward to? Just sitting there, in jail, surrounded by the Black people your white supremacist self purports to hate. That might be torture worse than death. ... read more »
Major Prostate Cancer Research Targeting African Americans Set to Begin
March 21, 2019
a national network of prostate cancer researchers and experts who have joined forces to study prostate cancer in African American men has received a $26 million grant as part of former Vice President Joe Biden’s Cancer Moonshot Initiative to conduct the largest study ever to look at the underlying factors and reasons that put African American men at higher risk for developing and dying from prostate cancer. ... read more »
Judge Rules “Profit Over People” Lawsuit May Proceed Against Pharmaceutical Giant Gilead Sciences, Inc.
March 1, 2019
According to HIV Litigation Attorneys, spearheading the effort to bring the drug manufacturer to justice, there is substantial evidence that Gilead withheld a safer alternative version of drugs to treat HIV for over a decade until its original patents on its other medication expired.   ... read more »
SISTERS WHO MADE US PROUD IN 2018
January 3, 2019
Black women in politics opened many new doors, ran in many areas across the country, who won and helped others win. We’ve come a long way since Rep. Shirley Chisholm became the first Black woman elected to Congress. ... read more »
Because of the CBC, the Farm Bill Includes Millions for HBCUs, Black Farmers, and Rural Communities of Color
January 3, 2019
Singer-songwriter, Janet Jackson asked: “What have you done for me lately?” This is a question the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) is asked a lot. ... read more »
Criminal Justice Bill Passes Senate; House Approval Expected
December 19, 2018
The Senate passed a sweeping criminal justice bill Tuesday that addresses concerns that the nation’s war on drugs had led to the imprisonment of too many Americans for non-violent crimes without adequately preparing them for their return to society. ... read more »
Our Vote: More Than A Desire for History, The Very Strides to Make It 
November 15, 2018
“…what happened in Georgia wasn’t just about job titles. This was about the misinformation that Stacey’s opponent peddled throughout the campaign and how he took advantage of his taxpayer-funded position to help run his campaign.”  ... read more »
The Black Death: Black Deaths Matter?
November 8, 2018
It has been four days since the massacre at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. It is Halloween, and the funerals began yesterday for the 11 victims. It has been called “the worst attack on Jews in American history.” The coverage has been relentless throughout the media, and touching vignettes of the lives of the victims have been ubiquitous. President Donald Trump has ordered flags at federal buildings throughout the United States to be flown at half-staff in "solemn respect" for the victims. Grotesque irony notwithstanding, United States President Donald Trump also visited the site of the massacre yesterday and met with victims and/or their families. ... read more »
The Criminalization of Poverty: Cash Bail for Non-Violent Misdemeanors Perpetuates Unequal Treatment Under the Law
October 4, 2018
Praise the Lord, indeed. Since the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Black voting rates – particularly in presidential years – rose steadily. In 2008, the Black voting rate matched the White rate for the first time and in 2012 exceeded it. Not coincidentally, in 2013 the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act and the Black voter turnout in 2016 dipped to a low not seen since 2004. ... read more »
New Orleans Publicly Unveiling Slave Market Tour App
October 1, 2018
Photo Source: http://www.cah.utexas.edu/db/dmr/   NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The city of New Orleans has unveiled a smartphone app tour of sites involved in the slave trade during the 18th and 19th centuries, ... read more »
Breaking the Gubernatorial Glass Ceiling
September 14, 2018
In the 240-year history of the United States, four African American men have presided as the chief executive of a state or commonwealth. Only two were elected in their own right – Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, in 2006, and Douglas Wilder of Virginia, in 1989. David Paterson of New York was elevated to the office upon the resignation of Eliot Spitzer in 2008 ... read more »
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