Black men

Political Cartoonist Changing the World One Illustration at a Time

  This June, the Sentinel is putting the spotlight on Black men, highlighting their life and how they make a difference in the world. David G. Brown is an award-winning artist, who’s editorial cartoons have been featured in the Sentinel for the last 20 years. A gifted designer, photographer and illustrator, David’s work and merits are impressive. He grew up in West Atco, a small town in South Jersey outside of Atlantic City. David earned his Bachelor’s degree at Stockton University where he has received the Arts and Humanities Professional Achievement Award in 2011 and recently, the Alumni Impact Award

TJ Sterling is Creating a Way with RAE Comics

TJ Sterling is an artist, writer and the president and lead artist of RAE Comics, which stands for Red, Arcis, the Latin word for stronghold, fortress or house and Entertainment. RAE Comics features diverse and underrepresented characters that go outside traditional American comics mixed with Eastern philosophies, creating something unique.

Local Pilot Paves the Way to New Success for Black youth with United Airlines 

Compton-native, Kenneth Kirkpatrick, better known as “KP”—has actively worked to bring awareness around the flourishing career path of piloting commercial airplanes. As a United Airline Captain, Kirkpatrick has used his platform to pave a runway for Black youth to take off toward new heights for success in aviation.  

2023 POLICE AND BLACK MEN:  DEAD OR ALIVE? 

We are only 31 days into 2023, but the level of violence and deadly occurrences between the police and Black men is already trending towards a record and tragic high.   

COMMENTARY: Collision Course (Part 2)

“Although I have no personal knowledge of when Dr. King died, I fully support the research of Dr. William Pepper, who has established that King’s life was terminated at the hospital. His research came through a credible witness, Johnton Shelby, whose mother personally witnessed the event. According to these sources, King did not die immediately, but shortly after being shot and transported to the hospital, when he was smothered to death with a pillow by the head surgeon, Dr. Breen Bland.” — Phillip F. Nelson, author of “Who REALLY Killed Martin Luther King,” in an interview with Our Weekly.

New York Fund Apologizes for Role in Tuskegee Syphilis Study

For almost 40 years starting in the 1930s, as government researchers purposely let hundreds of Black men die of syphilis in Alabama so they could study the disease, a foundation in New York covered funeral expenses for the deceased. The payments were vital to survivors of the victims in a time and place ravaged by poverty and racism.

Prostate Cancer Rising in Black America 

Whether it is other philanthropists, local or regional health centers, or state and federal officials, there is a desperate need for creative solutions to getting more people screened and saving more lives. Smith’s initiative is an innovative approach, but there are other ways to spread awareness and boost screenings in the Black community.