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COVID-19 and Black People
April 2, 2020
At present the CDC has noted that those with chronic lung disease, moderate to severe asthma, serious heart conditions, those immunocompromised including cancer treatment, severely obese, diabetic, with renal failure, or liver disease are at higher risk for severe illness. That warning should be clearly heard by the African American community. We are 2.2 times more likely to have diabetes, 20% more likely to have high blood pressure, and 30% more likely to be obese. The incidence of COPD (lung disease) in our women is 34% higher than in White women. Bottom line, if we acquire the virus, bad things are more likely to happen. That’s pass number one. ... read more »
Minority-Owned Media Not Forgotten in Stimulus Legislation
April 2, 2020
Another $10 million has been designated for the Minority Business Development Agency within the Department of Commerce to provide grants to Minority Business Centers and Minority Chambers of Commerce to provide counseling, training, and education on federal resources and business response to the COVID-19 for small businesses. ... read more »
Study: African Americans Poorer Today Than Five Years Ago
March 12, 2020
“I don’t want to get political here, but I would hope that this report would color how people view the approaches that the parties and candidates take toward legislative and social issues, and how those things are framed,” Lending Tree Lead Researcher Kali McFadden told NNPA Newswire. ... read more »
Black California Has a Chance to Rewrite History in 2020
March 12, 2020
History is not a precise science, nor an impartial one. Take a glance at a history textbook from past decades, and you will quickly understand that American history was written from the viewpoint of white men.   ... read more »
For People of Color, Gentrification is More a Curse than a Blessing
February 27, 2020
According to a March 2019 study by the National Community Reinvestment Coalition (NCRC), more than 135,000 Black and Hispanics around the nation were displaced between 2000 and 2012. Gentrification and displacement of long-time residents were most intense from 2000 to 2013 in the nation's biggest cities, and rare in most other places, according to the study. During those years, gentrification was concentrated in larger cities with vibrant economies but also appeared in smaller cities where it often impacted areas with the most amenities near central business districts. ... read more »
Are Republican Senators in Fear of ‘Don Corleone’ Trump? “Yes!” Says Schumer
December 26, 2019
On Thursday, December 19, NNPA Newswire interviewed Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY). The discussion covered a wide range of topics, focusing primarily on the impeachment of the president. The Senator also shared some insight on his conversations with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). ... read more »
Garth C. Reeves Sr., Retired Miami Times Publisher and Black Press Pioneer, Dies
December 5, 2019
Garth C. Reeves, Sr., The Miami Times’ retired publisher who became the enduring patriarch of a family newspaper dynasty after decades of fighting the political establishment and while guiding the black community through the city’s racial problems, died on Monday, November 25. He was 100. ... read more »
Black Teen Suicide Reaches Historic Highs
November 7, 2019
Researchers in the NYU study noted that suicide is the second-leading cause of death for teens from all demographics. ... read more »
Speaker, Author Cheron Griffin is on a Mission to Stem Epidemic of Suicide Among Black Youth with New Book
September 26, 2019
Shocked and saddened by what she was hearing in her classrooms when she worked as a substitute teacher a few years ago, Freedom Coach, Lifestyle Hacker, Dating Consultant, Divorce Guru, and author Cheron Griffin, felt she had to do something about it. “When I asked the children what was on their hearts, they started to tell me some of their parents and other family members had tried to commit suicide and how it affected them.” Some of the children had themselves contemplated suicide citing low self-esteem, bullying, or abuse or not feeling loved in the home as reasons. ... read more »
NAREB Urges Black Americans Not to Defer Their Dream of Homeownership
September 12, 2019
According to the National Association of Real Estate Brokers (NAREB) wealth building usually begins with that first investment in owning your own home. Whether you purchase a first-time “starter” home or inherit a property or residence, you start down the road to building wealth. But something has changed in the Black community. The U.S. Census Bureau’s latest statistics indicate that the Black homeownership rate has dropped once again. ... read more »
Remembering the Watts Revolt: A Shared Condition, Consciousness and Commitment
August 29, 2019
The Anniversary of the 1965 Watts Revolt occurs in the context of a larger history of Black struggle, sacrifices and achievements: the assassination, sacrifice and martyrdom of Min. Malcolm X; the Selma March; the Voting Rights Act; the founding of our organization Us and the African American Cultural Center; and the introduction of the Black value system, the Nguzo Saba, which became the core values of the pan-African holiday Kwanzaa and of Kawaida, a major Movement philosophy of life and struggle. ... read more »
Grassroots Champion: Fighting for Park Equity
May 30, 2019
When I was a kid, my local park was my second home. I perfected my jump shot and gooooooooooal celebration there. I tried to look cool waiting for the girl I liked to walk home from school through the park. I tested my gardening skills in our park. I even studied physics and engineering as I built and destroyed a ton of creations in the park. I needed the park. I loved the park. I still love parks. ... read more »
Hate Crimes and Solutions Offered by Activists
May 3, 2019
Phyllis G. Williams, the co-host of the podcast “Living the Principles,” said one reason hate crimes are increasing is that criminals of those actions typically gain notoriety. “Hate crimes with mass media exposure are nothing shy of a recruiting tool. This is why we have seen an increase over the last few years,” Williams said. ... read more »
A Kind of Farewell, Looking Back and Forward
April 25, 2019
After enjoying writing this column thirty-three (33) years for the Sentinel, this will be my final submission of over 1,700 columns. Stepping away from this gratifying and engaging weekly task and challenge is not easy. But I know that everything, even good things, eventually run their course and a new course begins. And recent health issues, as well as the long record of daily activism I have achieved, tell me it’s time. Some might wonder why I’m stopping now, but others might wonder how and why I kept on going so long? ... read more »
A. Philip Randolph: Cultural Grounding Key to His Success
February 21, 2019
Randolph’s grounding in his own culture enabled him to successfully collaborate with others, including Whites, other labor unions, government officials and politicians. Racial and cultural grounding are prerequisites for effectively working with others and must become part of conversations and strategies to reverse Blacks’ current self-denigrating mindsets and ineffective leadership. That said, the following are highlights in A. Philip Randolph’s quest to improve the quality of life for Blacks and other oppressed people. ... read more »
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