Saturday, June 19, 2021
CLOSE
 
LA County Revisits the Importance of Mental Health After COVID-19 Surge; The Work of Los Angeles Department of Mental Health is ‘Amplified’ Due to Current State of Pandemic
By Betti Halsell Contributing Writer
Published November 13, 2020

Los Angeles Public officials updated the county about the latest news surrounding the coronavirus outbreak. The Los Angeles Public Health Department and Health Services shared new reports of the current stand on hospitalization and community transmission. There has been an increase for mental health services during COVID-19.

Barbara Ferrer, PhD, MPH, MEd, Director, Public Health (screen shot)

Recent statistics shown on Wednesday reflect 7 additional deaths, two of these individuals were over the age of 80, one of them had underlining health conditions. Two people who died were between the ages of 65-79; both victims had preexisting health concerns. One individual was between the ages of 50-64, and they did not have any previous medical concerns.  This brings the total COVID-19 related deaths in L.A. County to 7,221.

The relationship between COVID-19 infection and ethnicity were provided. The racial background collected 6,810 fatal cases showed 10% were African American, 14% were Asian, slightly less than 1% were Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 52% were LatinX, 23% were White, and 1% identified as a different race or ethnicity. 92% of those who died due to COVID-19 had preexisting health concerns.

There were 2,533 new COVID-19 reports, Los Angeles Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer stated this was a particularly low number due to a miscount happening within their test process. In summary, there is an approximate amount of 330,450 coronavirus cases in the Los Angeles region. 13,967 incidents were reported in the city of Long Beach and 3,008 cases in the city of Pasadena. Amid the unsheltered, there were 2,146 positive cases.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Chairwoman of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors Kathryn Barger explained the county has partnered up with Headspace, a program that offers meditation and resources that encourage mindfulness. This program is free to all Los Angeles County residents. There has been a critical eye on the relationship between the pandemic and its affects on mental health since “Mental Health Awareness Month” back in May of this year.

During that time Barger stated, “The mental health challenges, by far is something we need to talk about and educate people about resources that are available.” Earlier this year, the stress and mental stability were recognized, and L.A. County wanted to make mental health resources available to everyone during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The County started with the We Rise initiative, which was a “Community capacity, building celebration of healing mental health and well-being powered by creative expression and connectedness.” The program has been active for two years and has now gone completely virtual in its third year. One can find Head Space and We Rise on the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Website, at DMH.LACounty.Gov

The Director of the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Jonathan E. Sherin stated on the official DMH website that “The importance of our work is amplified when our communities face unpredictable, unprecedented and painful challenges. The trauma of racial injustice and the continued presence of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) impact each person’s mental well-being in different ways.”

As news of an increase in the spread of the COVID-19 virus arises, it has also heightened the senses of worry about what more can be endured; the outbreak has been a rollercoaster filled with twists and turns. There has been extreme strain put on everyone to have stability and a light shined on the overall quality of life. The County of Los Angeles continue the stride to move into the Los Angeles Public officials updated the county about the latest news surrounding the coronavirus outbreak. The Los Angeles Public Health Department and Health Services shared new reports of the current stand on hospitalization and community transmission. There has been an increase for mental health services during COVID-19.

Recent statistics shown on Wednesday reflect 7 additional deaths, two of these individuals were over the age of 80, one of them had underlining health conditions. two people who died were between the ages of 65-79, both victims had preexisting health concerns. One individual was between the ages of 50-64, and they did not have any previous medical concerns.  This brings the total COVID-19 related deaths in L.A. County to 7,221.

ADVERTISEMENT

The relationship between COVID-19 infection and ethnicity were provided. The racial background collected 6,810 fatal cases showed 10% were African American, 14% were Asian, slightly less than 1% were Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, 52% were LatinX, 23% were White, and 1% identified as a different race or ethnicity. 92% of those who died due to COVID-19 had preexisting health concerns.

There were 2,533 new COVID-19 reports, Los Angeles Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer stated this was a particularly low number due to a miscount happening within their test process. In summary, there is an approximate amount of 330,450 coronavirus cases in the Los Angeles region. 13,967 incidents were reported in the city of Long Beach and 3,008 cases in the city of Pasadena. Amid the unsheltered, there were 2,146 positive cases.

The Chairwoman of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors, Kathryn Barger explained the county has partnered up with Headspace, a program that offers meditation and resources that encourage mindfulness. This program is free to all Los Angeles County residents. There has been a critical eye on the relationship between the pandemic and its affects on mental health since “Mental Health Awareness Month” back in May of this year.

During that time Barger stated, “The mental health challenges, by far is something we need to talk about, and educate people about resources that are available.”  Earlier this year, the stress and mental stability were recognized, and L.A. County wanted to make mental health resources available to everyone during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The County started with the We Rise initiative, which was a “Community capacity, building celebration of healing mental health and wellbeing powered by creative expression and connectedness.” The program has been active for two years and has now gone completely virtual in its third year. One can find Head Space and We Rise on the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Website, at DMH.LACounty.Gov

The Director of the Los Angeles Department of Mental Health Jonathan E. Sherin stated on the official DMH website that “The importance of our work is amplified when our communities face unpredictable, unprecedented and painful challenges. The trauma of racial injustice and the continued presence of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) impact each person’s mental wellbeing in different ways.”

As news of an increase in the spread of the COVID-19 virus arises, it has also heightened the senses of worry about what more can be endured, the outbreak has been a rollercoaster filled with twists and turns. There has been extreme strain put on everyone to have stability and a light shined on the overall quality of life. The County of Los Angeles continue the stride to move into the unknown but with more resources to get the mental help needed on the journey to a new frontier.

 

Updated: 11/18/20 by original author

Categories: COVID-19 | News | Uncategorized
Tags: | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |

Get the Los Angeles Sentinel App!



Since 1933 The Voice of Our Community Speaking for Itself.
88 Years of LA Sentinel.
Black News.
SEARCH:    
Videos


Black Fact of the Day


Photo of the Day

Events

LA Sentinel
in your pocket:





TOS-Cookbook-Web

LA Watts Times

 
© 2021 Los Angeles Sentinel All Rights Reserved • A Bakewell Media Publication

AboutArchivesContact UsCorrections & MisprintsMedia Kit

Terms of ServicePrivacy Policy

LA Watts TimesTaste of Soul