civil rights movement

NBA Creates Annual Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Social Justice Champion Award to Honor Player Activism

The award is named after six-time NBA champion and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who has dedicated his life to the fight for equality. The recipient will have advanced Abdul-Jabbar’s mission to drive change and inspired others to reflect on injustice and take collective action in their communities over the previous year.

Black Clergy Leader, Rev. Dr. Sylvester Beaman, Delivers Historic Inaugural Benediction

“We need a president who is after the heart of God,” Rev. Dr. Sylvester Beaman, of Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Wilmington, Delaware, told NBC News. “In these terrible times, if anybody can bring healing and reconciliation to a divided country, if we give him room to work, Joe Biden can be that person,” Rev. Beaman continued.

Former NBA Star Junior Bridgeman Purchases EBONY Magazine

According to the Michigan Chronicle, Bridgeman, who played for the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Clippers, was once featured on a 2016 Forbes top-paid athletes list. He is the CEO of a Coca-Cola bottling company and part-owner of Coca-Cola Canada Bottling Limited. The former athlete attempted to purchase Sports Illustrated in 2018 but eventually withdrew his bid a year later.

Senate Runoffs in Georgia Offer A Clear Choice

On Jan. 5, Georgia will hold a run-off election for both of its Senate seats. The races capture national attention because control of the Senate is at stake. If the two Democratic challengers, Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock, both win, the Senate will be effectively split 50-50, with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris breaking the tie. If one or both lose, Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell will retain his ability to obstruct the incoming president.

CELEBRATION OF LIFE: MLB Great Bob Gibson Dies at 84

Gibson emerged as a raw, but immensely talented rookie who would not be denied stardom. He became a full-time starting pitcher in July 1961 and earned his first All-Star appearance in 1962. Gibson won two of three games he pitched in the 1964 World Series, then won 20 games in a season for the first time in 1965. Gibson also pitched three complete game victories in the 1967 World Series.

County Proclaims ‘Rev. James M. Lawson, Jr. Day’

September 22, 2020, will mark the 92nd Birthday of a statesman who, since the 1950s, continues to be actively involved in training countless men and women on nonviolent resistance to achieve social justice. He has taught at the University of California, Los Angeles, California State University, Northridge, and countless other educational institutions–and even in retirement continues to travel across the country to teach nonviolence.

BHERC “THE FORGOTTEN” GRASSROOTS CIVIL RIGHTS EXHIBITION CONTINUES TO DRAW ACCOLADES AND PUBLIC ATTENTION

The Black Hollywood Education and Resource Center (BHERC) exhibition “The Forgotten” wall, an addition to the BHERC “Say Their Name” exhibition in Los Angeles, CA., are 57 names of Black men and women identified by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) that succumbed to racial violence between 1952 to 1968. The addition compliments the original special collection of names researched and first installed over the 2020 Independence Day weekend that is presented as a sobering memorial display of 41 individual markers of the names of men and women in memoriam who were killed by police violence in more recent times. 

Transcript: Barack Obama’s address at John Lewis’ funeral

As a boy, John listened through the door after bedtime as his father’s friends complained about the Klan. One Sunday as a teenager, he heard Dr. King preach on the radio. As a college student in Tennessee, he signed up for Jim Lawson’s workshops on the tactic of nonviolent civil disobedience. John Lewis was getting something inside his head, an idea he couldn’t shake that took hold of him – that nonviolent resistance and civil disobedience were the means to change laws, but also change hearts, and change minds, and change nations, and change the world.

Lifting Up Lowery, Vivian and Lewis: Living the Legacy, Freeing the People

Clearly, there are several lessons to be gleaned from the legacy of these freedom warriors and workers for a new society and world. And the first is to rightfully locate them in Black history among their people, our people in the midst of an unfinished and ongoing Black freedom struggle. Indeed, there can be no correct understanding, appropriate appreciation or honest emulation of their lives and the lives of all those who preceded them and made them and us possible and of those who were their co-combatants, unless we place them all in the context of their people, our people, Black people and our struggle.