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Black Freedom Movement
Beyond the Bondage of Plantation Politics: Crafting Our Own Presidential Platform
May 9, 2019
Thus, we self-consciously called our Movement, the Black Freedom Movementand demanded “FreedomNow,” not civil rights now. We composed and sang freedomsongs, not civil rights songs. And we built freedomschools, not civil rights schools, and we risked our lives on freedomrides, not civil rights rides. You can always say there was indeed a fight for civil rights. But although civil rights were an important concern of the Black Freedom Movement, the Black Freedom struggle was committed to freedom as a more expansive concept, practice and goal. In a word, it was concerned about freedom from oppression and freedom to grow, develop and come into the fullness of ourselves. ... read more »
Beyond the Bondage of Plantation Politics: Crafting Our Own Presidential Platform
May 2, 2019
During both the Holocaust of enslavement and the era of segregation, leaving the plantation was a metaphor, mental process and actual practice of freedom. It was a freeing oneself mentally and physically, thinking freedom and then acting in ways that led to its achievement as did Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, Fannie Lou Hamer, Messenger Muhammad and countless others in their rejection of and resistance to enslavement and segregation. Clearly, it is rumored and reported in various official and unofficial send-outs and circles that we have all left the plantation and are all free. But today, regardless of official edited and embellished reports; images of mixed couples and company in TV commercials and movies; and our wishing and wanting to believe we are beyond its borders and bondage, the plantation and its politics remains with us. ... read more »
Achieving Justice for Imam Jamil: A Battleline For All of Us
April 25, 2019
He came into the consciousness of his people and in the cross-hairs of the oppressor on the blood-stained battlefields and battlelines of the Black Freedom Movement of the 1960s. The media called Imam Jamil Al-Amin, H. Rap Brown then, but we just called him Rap because of the hard hitting, defiant, rhythmic and righteous way he described and condemned our oppressor and oppression and praised our people and challenged them to stand up, step forward and continue the liberation struggle. ... read more »
Justice, Reaffirmation and Resistance: Advancing An African American Ethical Agenda
March 14, 2019
In this era of political madness, mean-spiritedness, racial and religious scapegoating, continued and expanding police violence, obscene inequities in wealth and power, mass incarceration, extensive and needless poverty and proposals for mass deportations, immigration bans, an apartheid wall and national registries of suspected and stigmatized peoples, there is an urgent need for an African American communal voice of  moral courage, political reason, and expanded righteous and relentless resistance. In a word, there is a pressing need for an African American ethical agenda speaking to the critical issues of our times. ... read more »
Concerning History, Heritage and Struggle: Reaffirming and Renewing Our Vanguard Role
February 28, 2019
If we are to know ourselves rightly, honor our history, radically improve our present and forge a future worthy of the names African and human, then we must reaffirm and renew our moral and social vanguard role as a people, wage righteous and relentless resistance to evil and injustice everywhere, and put forth in plan and practice a new history and hope for our people and humankind. In the months of February and March, which we of Us have designated as Black History Month I (General Focus) and Black History Month II (Women Focus), our people have set aside time and space to celebrate ourselves inhistoryand ashistory. For we are producers and products of this sacred narrative, and the subject and center of this awesome record and struggle, the most ancient of human histories. ... read more »
The Compelling Need and Notion of Freedom: Retrieving Our Expansive Concept of Struggle
January 24, 2019
As we celebrate each year our strivings and struggles through history, the Black Freedom Movement is always a central focus. But we may not call it by its rightful name, because it has been renamed by the established order as the Civil Rights Movement and this has implications for us in terms of self-determination and how we define our goals, what we count as victory, and the lessons and spirit of life and struggle we learn and absorb from this world historical struggle. Our urgent and constant call was “Freedom Now!” and even now, it is no less necessary. ... read more »
Rereading King in Critical Times: Mapping and Making Our Way Forward
January 9, 2019
In these critical times which unavoidably raise the pressing questions of mapping and making our way forward regardless, a thoughtful rereading of Dr. Martin Luther King’s historical speech, “Where Do We Go From Here?” offers us an excellent point of departure. ... read more »
Retrieving the African ideal: A Courageous Questioning in these Times
November 29, 2018
The conception and development of  our philosophy, Kawaida, the work and struggle of our organization Us, and the people-focus, cultural groundedness and social consciousness of the leadership and people we seek to cultivate, teach and exemplify, all began with what our ancestors called in the Husia a “courageous questioning.” ... read more »
“Kawaida and the Current Crisis: A Philosophy of Life, Love and Struggle”
November 1, 2018
Clearly, we, as a people, are in the midst of a deep social crisis, one not only in terms of the conditions of our community, but also in the context of this country.  ... read more »
Us at 53: Reaffirming Our Revolutionary Spirit and Radical Imagination
October 4, 2018
And as part of this process, I want to share reflections of this revolutionary spirit and radical imagination found in The Quotable Karenga, which contains critical concepts that served as foundation and framework for our thought and practice of revolutionary cultural nationalism. ... read more »
Living and Singing Soul with Aretha: Respecting Our Awesome and Soulful Selves
August 23, 2018
Whatever others may say in clearly deserved praise and homage to Aretha Franklin, it is vitally important that we, as persons and a people, speak our own special cultural truth about her and make our own unique assessment of her music, life, service and meaning to us. Here I mean not letting others’ descriptions of her and her music serve as an orientation and framework for our own praise and proper due, but rather reaching inside ourselves and understanding and speaking of her in a multiplicity of meaningful and praise-worthy ways drawn and distilled from the depths of our own hearts and our own culture. ... read more »
Black People in War and Struggle: The Mirror and Message of Malcolm X
February 22, 2018
Indeed, Malcolm reminds us that the rulers of this country talk of peace, but they continue to make war everywhere. ... read more »
Annual Founder’s Kwanzaa Message—2017 (Part 2)
December 28, 2017
“Practicing the Principles of Kwanzaa: Repairing, Renewing and Remaking Our World” ... read more »
Celebration of Fannie Lou Hamer’s 100th Birthday
October 12, 2017
Crumble expressed that he was the first in his family to attend college; he was ready to give up in his first semester due to an unfriendly atmosphere and a feeling of disconnect, until an African Studies class in womanism introduced him to Hamer. ... read more »
Concerning History, Heritage and Struggle: Reaffirming and Renewing Our Vanguard Role
January 31, 2017
U.S. society is by all standards standing at the edge of a cliff of crisis ... read more »
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