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Los Angeles County 2016 Election Results
By Kimberlee Buck, Contributing Writer & Amanda Scurlock, Sports Writer
Published November 10, 2016

As of Tuesday, November 8, the 2016 Los Angeles County election has come to an end. Below are the election results.

Janice Hahn

Courtesy Photo

Courtesy Photo

Congresswoman Janice Hahn is the daughter of Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenny Hahn and the U.S. Representative of the 44th district of California. As of press time, Congresswoman Hahn wins against her opponent Steve Napolitano for the Board of Supervisors of the 4th district with Hahn receiving 55 percent of the vote and Napolitano receiving 44 percent.

Karen Bass

Courtesy Photo

Courtesy Photo

In 2014, Congress member Karen Bass was re-elected to her third term representing the 37th Congressional District. This election year Congress member Bass will continue to hold her seat securing more than 85 percent of the vote against her opponent Chris Blake Wiggins.

Maxine Waters

Courtesy Photo

Courtesy Photo

Congresswoman Maxine Waters was elected in 2014 to her thirteenth term in the U.S. House of Representatives. During the 2016 election year, Waters beat her opponent Omar Navarro for the U.S. Representative 43rd by more than 73 percent.

Holly Mitchell

Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo

Senator Holly J. Mitchell has served as the State Legislature since 2011. In 2014, she was elected to represent the 30th Senate District.

Mike Antonovich

Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich currently serves on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. This year, Supervisor Antonovich secured more than 57 percent of the vote against Anthony J. Portantino for the State Senator of the 25th District.

Kathryn Barger

Courtesy Photo

Courtesy Photo

Kathryn Barger is a new candidate in the November 2016 election. Barger secured her position as Supervisor in L.A. County’s 5th District, which current Supervisor Michael Antonovich currently holds. Barger beat her opponent Darrell Park by more than 60 percent.

Reggie Jones Sawyer

Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo

Assemblyman Reggie Jones Sawyer has covered the 59th district and was elected to the state legislature in November 2012. He defended the neighborhoods in the Florence-Firestone, Huntington Park and South L.A. areas with legislature that supported people who were wrongfully convicted, immigrants and students.

Autumn Burke

Assemblywoman Autumn R. Burke (courtesy photo)

Assemblywoman Autumn R. Burke (courtesy photo)

Autumn Burke was reelected as California State Assembly member for District 62, winning by 78 percent of the votes. Burke supported environmentally-friendly projects, supporting business that use green technology. She also insured funding for k-12 schools to improve technology used and have small class sizes.

Sebastian Ridley-Thomas

Courtesy Photo

Courtesy Photo

Sebastian Ridley-Thomas won over Glen Ratcliff almost unanimously with 82 percent of votes. Ridley-Thomas fought for healthcare for underserved communities and tax relief for small business.

Chris Holden

Courtesy photod

Courtesy photod

As of 11:48, Chris Holden was leading the race for District 41. In September, his bill to increase housing for foster children was signed by governor Jerry Brown.

Steve Bradford

(Courtesy photo)

(Courtesy photo)

Steve Bradford defeated Warren Furutani for a seat in the Senate. Bradford is an advocate for immigration rights, fighting against homelessness, and healthcare access.

Mike Gipson

Courtesy Photo

Courtesy Photo

District 64 will have Mike Gipson, who won the election by earning 74 percent of votes. Gipson wrote bills that granted an appeal process for the Cal Grant and that provided Hepatitis C testing at primary care clinics.

State Measures  

51 School Bonds, Funding for K-12 School and Community

State measure 51 passed by more than 54 percent.  The measure authorizes $9 billion in general obligation bonds for new construction and modernization of K-12 public school facilities; charter schools and vocational education facilities and Community College facilities.

 52 Medi-Cal hospital fee program imitative

State measure 52 passed with more than 73 percent. According to the ballot, the proposition will impose fees on hospitals in order to fund Medi-Cal health care services and care for patients.

53 Revenue Bonds

As of press time, State measure 53 did not pass. The measure requires statewide voter approval prior to any revenue bonds being issued or sold by the state for various projects that exceed the $2 million bond amount.

54 Legislature Legislation and Proceedings

This state measure passed with more than 64 percent.  The measure prohibits Legislature from passing any bills unless the bills are published on the internet for 72 hours prior to voting.

55 Tax Extensions

Proposition 55 passed with more than 64 percent. The proposition extends twelve years the temporary personal income tax increases that were enacted during 2012 on earnings over $250,000.

56 Cigarette Tax

The state measure passed with 66 percent. The measure is said to increases cigarette tax by $2.00 per pack, the measure also includes other tobacco products and electronic cigarettes.

57 Criminal Sentencing Parole

The measure passed by 67 percent. The measure allows parole consideration for felon’s who are nonviolent.

58 English Proficiency

State measure 58 also passes, requiring public schools to ensure students obtain English language proficiency.

59 Political Spending, Corporations

Proposition 59, a proposition about political spending, passed by earning 53 percent of votes. The prop asks if elected officials in California can reverse the effects of Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission and regulate campaign spending.

60 Condom Use in Adult Films

Voters said no to Proposition 60, a possible law that demanded adult film workers to wear condoms during the filming of sexual intercourse. The prop failed due to 54 percent of voters voting ‘no’.

61 Prescription Drug Purchases by the State

Proposition 61 also failed when 54 percent said no. Proposition 61 banned state agencies from purchasing prescription drugs at a higher price than the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

62 Death Penalty

California voters refused to repeal the death penalty with  54 percent of voters voting ‘no’ on prop 62. The law would have changed all death penalty charges to life without parole.

63 Ammunition Sales

Proposition 63 demanded reform on purchasing ammunition, 62 percent of voters wanted the reform to be a law. With the passing of this proposition, only licensed ammunition vendors can sell and people must pass a background check to purchase ammunition.

64 Legalizing Marijuana

The recreational use of marijuana has now been legalized by proposition 64 being passed. Adults over the age of 21 can now use marijuana. There will also be a 15 percent retail sales tax on marijuana.

65 Funds From Reusable Bags

The law that demanded stores to send bag sales to environmental projects was denied with 56 percent of California voters voting ‘no’ on proposition 65. Money stores earn from selling reusable bags would have gone to a fund oversaw by the Wildlife Conservation Board.

66 Procedures on the Death Penalty

In a close decision, voters agreed to speeding up the rate of executions by voting ‘yes’ to prop 66. The new law will put a time limit for state court death penalty review.

67 Ban on Single-Use Plastic Bags

Single-use grocery bags have now been banned from stores, 52 percent of voters agreed with prop 67. The law allows the sale of paper and reusable bags for at least 10 cents per bag.

City Measures

HHH

In the 2016 election, City measure HHH passed. The measure is said to provide safe, clean and affordable housing for the homeless and for residents in danger of becoming homeless. The city of Los Angeles will issue $1,200,000,000 in general obligation bond to help provide mental health care, drug and alcohol treatment among other services.

A

For the los Angeles Measures, voters decided to a 1.5-cent per square foot parcel to improve existing parks and build new ones with the passing of Measure A. The measure promises that $94 million will be raised annually to improve parks, beaches, trails, natural habitats and rivers.

JJJ

Measure JJJ passed, the measure is said to provide affordable housing and labor standards related to city planning. The ordinance will require the following: “1) certain residential development projects provide for affordable housing and comply with prevailing wage, local hiring and other labor standards; 2) requiring the City to assess the impacts of community plan changes on affordable housing and local jobs; 3) creating an affordable housing incentive program for developments near major transit stops; and 4) making other changes; be adopted?”

M

Voters also agreed to help fund major public transit projects by passing Measure M. The measure promises to expand rails, bus systems and subway systems. It also will improve potholes, repave streets and make earthquake retrofits on bridges.

CC

Los Angeles wanted to fund the renovation of community colleges by approving the $3.5 billion construction bond that was promised to the L.A. Community College District in Measure CC

RRR

Measure RRR passed as of press time. The measure states the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Charter Amendment will: Shall an ordinance: 1) requiring that certain residential development projects provide for affordable housing and comply with prevailing wage, local hiring and other labor standards; 2) requiring the City to assess the impacts of community plan changes on affordable housing and local jobs; 3) creating an affordable housing incentive program for developments near major transit stops; and 4) making other changes; be adopted?”

SSS

Measure SSS passed as of press time. The City of Los Angeles Fire and Police Pensions, Airport Officers Charter Amendment, states the charter shall be amended to: “Shall an ordinance: 1) requiring that certain residential development projects provide for affordable housing and comply with prevailing wage, local hiring and other labor standards; 2) requiring the City to assess the impacts of community plan changes on affordable housing and local jobs; 3) creating an affordable housing incentive program for developments near major transit stops; and 4) making other changes; be adopted?”

 

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