Wednesday, April 21, 2021
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L.A. City Council Selects Imagery from 10-Year-old Cartoonist  
By Betti Halsell, Contributing Writer
Published April 1, 2021

 

 

Fitfth-grade student Damahria Clark, 10, has illustrated the nation’s act of heroism, during the relentless battle against COVID-19. (courtesy photo by Clark Family.)

Damahria Clark has an artistic gift; at ten years old, she has projected a keen sense of awareness that radiates off her artwork. Clark has illustrated the nation’s act of heroism during the relentless battle against COVID-19.

As a young cartoonist, she has shown tremendous visual articulation, illustrating what the viral pandemic looks like from her point of view. Clark paints the world in vivid color and illuminates first responders working as everyday heroes. Her latest works is looking to be displayed in the center of the Los Angeles city region.

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Recent renditions of Clark’s imagery depict nurses triumphantly battling the coronavirus, honing into the vitality of the medical field during a health crisis. Each vibrant color she uses in her work sends out a sonic wave of encouragement for the men and women who show a daily sacrifice on the COVID-19 frontlines.

Clark paints the world in vivid color and illuminates first responders working as everyday heroes; her latest works is looking to be displayed in the center of the Los Angeles city region. (Courtesy photo by Clark Family)

The youthful cartoon artist captured her awareness of the nation’s well-being.  As the world looks for safe passage into a new reality, Clark uses digital mediums such as IBS Paint, Procreate, Flip Clip, and Illustrator to forge her innovative pieces.

Reflecting on the inspiration behind her drawings, Clark stated, “When I was in school, it was for me and my friends goofing off. Now, it’s sort of—seeing things, seeing things on the news, getting random ideas that I like, and doing something with them.”

Clark’s illustrations receive consistent nourishment, starting with her parents, Maria and Darryl Clark. Her father stated, “I am proud of my daughter because she is intelligent, she is thoughtful—she thinks of others …” He continued, “most of all, she is a humble kid; It is an honor for me to be her father.”

Following Mr. Clarks comments, her mother shared her sentiment, “As her mother, I am proud because she listens to suggestions and criticisms; she creates her own opportunity through her art and tennis and finds balance in her school …”

Reflecting on the inspiration behind her drawings, Clark stated, “When I was in school, it was for me and my friends goofing off, now it’s sort of—seeing things, seeing things on the news, getting random ideas that I like, and doing something with them.” (Courtesy photo by Clark Family)

Subsequently, inspiration flows from her mentor, L.A. Sentinel’s political artist, David G. Brown. He has tended to the creative carnations blooming in the Clark’s mind. Brown said, “Damahria Clark has been an incredible and inspirational mentee!”

The advisor continued, “We both have a passion for sports, creating art, and agree that one fuels the other. I believe she has the talent, intelligence, and drive to be successful at anything she sets her mind to!”

Clark reflected on her personal adjustment; she mentioned her thoughts of school before the viral pandemic and compared it to challenges presented in “at-home virtual learning.” Clark attends Carthay Center Environment Studies Magnate in the city of Los Angeles. Admittedly, she said she does miss some aspects of physically going to school, but she has grown to like virtual learning.


Clark continues to showcase a world in bold colors that has strong connection to any contribution made, is done in hope for a better world. (Courtesy photo by Clark Family)

 

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The fifth-grade student broke down her schedule; she logs into school every day and after an hour of focused work, they get a 10-minute break. Clark stated, “Whenever we have those 10-minute breaks, I usually just draw and then come back.” Afterwards, Clark would head to tennis practice for a few hours and finish her homework later in the evening.

Through personal alteration into the pandemic lifestyle, Clark has found a positive way to channel her energy. Although she does miss some aspect of physical learning, she has seen the benefits in virtual development; it has challenged her mind to be more focused, which Clark explained she has been extremely good in keeping the distractions to a minimum.

Clark described her schoolwork as “difficult” because it’s online, but she mentioned that one of her strengths is ignoring the distractions. She said, “You know, we are at home and we have extra distractions that you normally wouldn’t get at school, so I think I been handling that pretty well.” But In between her breaks, she likes to continue to paint the world as she sees it.

The young illustrator described her style of art as being more animated, stating, “My art style, when it comes to anatomy, it’s not very realistic, but that’s just how I like it.” Clark mentioned her drawings have a touch of anime inspiration; she explained that Cartoon Network’s Steven Universe is an animated series that inspires her.

Peering into her future, Clark stated, “If I did pick art as a career, I would try and get a job as someone who would do character design, because I really like designing characters.” Ultimately, Clark sees her path aligning with playing tennis professionally while studying character design in the background; her first college of choice is California Institute of the Arts.

Clark stated that she doesn’t remember a time when she didn’t draw; it has been a long-time passion. Her latest piece has been selected by Los Angeles City Council and will be judged at the Mid City Artist Contest Gala.

Clark paints the world in vivid color and illuminates first responders working as everyday heroes; her latest works is looking to be displayed in the center of the Los Angeles city region. (Courtesy photo by Clark Family)

When Clark is not illustrating everyday heroism or global unity, she likes to play tennis. She has taken home the gold on many occasions, winning first place in three high-caliber matches, in the West Coast South Bay Jr. Open (2020), the South Bay Satellite Tournament (2019), and California Tennis Association (2019). Clark has practiced swinging her tennis racket for roughly seven years.

In full transparency, Clark shared that the pandemic has made her nervous; the fluctuating case numbers and other heavily weighed news about COVID-19 has not the escape the ears of the youth. However, Clark has turned her worry into art of encouragement, looking at who is at the forefront and risking their lives every day to keep the coronavirus at bay.

Clark looks to uplift the world with her work, and she closed with this statement, “We’re all in this—we are all going through this. I know that some people don’t have the same outlook on this pandemic than others, but we will get through this—we are all in this together.”

The young cartoonist professed what she has been seeing on the news, through her art. The battle against COVID-19 has changed the reality of the world and highlighted the value of the essential workers on the frontline. Clark spoke with a sense of clarity, that everyone is in this together, regardless of color or background, unity is the answer. She continues to showcase a world in bold colors that has strong connection to any contribution made, is done so in hope for a better world.

 

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