Monday, January 24, 2022
CLOSE
 
SCLC Aims to Keep King’s Dream Relevant
By Cora Jackson-Fossett, Religion Editor
Published January 11, 2017
Martin Luther King came to Los Angeles in February 1964 and delivered a sermon to a standing room only crowd of 2,000 at the Second Baptist Church. Reverend Thomas Kilgore, pastor of Second Baptist and pictured here, had known King as a youth and recalled, "He was a precocious youngster as I remember, always full of questions and quick to learn." (Rolland Curtis photo)

Martin Luther King came to Los Angeles in February 1964 and delivered a sermon to a standing room only crowd of 2,000 at the Second Baptist Church. Reverend Thomas Kilgore, pastor of Second Baptist and pictured here, had known King as a youth and recalled, “He was a precocious youngster as I remember, always full of questions and quick to learn.” (Rolland Curtis photo)

On Monday, Jan. 16, America will observe the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Municipalities and organizations throughout the nation will hold a range of celebrations highlighting his enduring efforts in the area of civil rights.

In Los Angeles, several events will be sponsored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), a group King helped found in 1957 to coordinate nonviolent protest activities against segregation and pursue equality for African Americans.

King, the Rev. Dr. Thomas Kilgore, Jr., then-pastor of Second Baptist Church; and Douglas Dollarhide, the first Black Mayor of Compton, established SCLC of Southern California in Los Angeles in 1964.

ADVERTISEMENT

Over the past 60 years, SCLC has grown with chapters and affiliates across the country dedicated to developing programs to improve the lives of all Americans, regardless of color, religion or background.

Yet, some still wonder, 48 years after his assassination, if King’s approach and vision are still relevant or even needed in the 21st century.

According to Pastor William Smart, SCLC-SC president/CEO, the answer is a resounding, “Yes! When we look at the violent terrain in America, the message of peace and advocacy is definitely needed.”

Pastor William Smart

                                                              Pastor William Smart

Smart shared that SCLC-SC is consistently involved in activities to further the legacy of Dr. King, especially in the areas of economic justice and youth empowerment.

“The new civil right is economic parity. We have to close the wealth gap between African Americans and White Americans. SCLC, through programs like The Poor Peoples Campaign, has always worked and will continue to work on programs like that to bring people into greater economic wealth and financial stability,” said Smart.

SCLC-SC is also assisting young people through its Youth Educational Summer Program. The goal is to prepare and develop youth to attend the best schools and excel, and then return with their knowledge to help their communities realize an improved quality of life and financial wealth.

To achieve these goals, Smart issued an invitation to churches and faith-based organizations to unite with SCLC-SC in furthering the legacy of Dr. King by establishing social action committees.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Social action committees, like SCLC-SC, are a community resource, which works to improve the condition of the impoverished,” said Smart. “They can make a difference in communities through activities such as promoting voter engagement, develop strategies to combat any move to destroy the Affordable Care Act and the establishment of a strong Homeless Ministry,” said Smart.

To learn more about SCLC-SC and its King Week activities, visit sclc-sc.org.

 

Categories: Religion

Get the Los Angeles Sentinel App!



Since 1933 The Voice of Our Community Speaking for Itself.
89 Years of LA Sentinel.
Black News.
SEARCH:    
Videos


Black Fact of the Day


Photo of the Day

Events

LA Sentinel
in your pocket:





TOS-Cookbook-Web

LA Watts Times

 
© 2022 Los Angeles Sentinel All Rights Reserved • A Bakewell Media Publication

AboutArchivesContact UsCorrections & MisprintsMedia Kit

Terms of ServicePrivacy Policy

LA Watts TimesTaste of Soul

Close / I'm already on the list

Subscribe Today!

Don't be limited anymore! Subscribe Now »

** Existing subscribers, please Login / Register for Digital »

Subscribe to The Los Angeles Sentinel for only $5.99 $3.99 per month, with 1 month free!

Relax in comfort each week as you read the printed newspaper on your own time, delivered weekly to your home or office. This subscription also includes UNLIMITED DIGITAL ACCESS for all of your devices. Includes FREE shipping! One easy payment of $3.99/month gets you:

Subscribe Now »