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Law school to discuss latest in black teen’s 1944 execution
Published September 1, 2016
Miller Shealy, a professor at the Charleston School of Law, announces at the school in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, that attorneys plan to bring a civil rights lawsuit stemming from the 1944 execution of George Stinney. Stinney, executed in Columbia, S.C., was one of the youngest defendants executed in American history and the youngest executed in the 20th century. An all-white jury took only 10 minutes to decide Stinney's fate in the summer of 1944. A South Carolina state judge vacated the conviction almost two years ago. Attorneys announced Friday they will be working with law school students to file a lawsuit on behalf of Stinney's family. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)

Miller Shealy, a professor at the Charleston School of Law, announces at the school in Charleston, S.C., on Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, that attorneys plan to bring a civil rights lawsuit stemming from the 1944 execution of George Stinney. Stinney, executed in Columbia, S.C., was one of the youngest defendants executed in American history and the youngest executed in the 20th century. An all-white jury took only 10 minutes to decide Stinney’s fate in the summer of 1944. A South Carolina state judge vacated the conviction almost two years ago. Attorneys announced Friday they will be working with law school students to file a lawsuit on behalf of Stinney’s family. (AP Photo/Bruce Smith)

 

 

 

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CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) _ Faculty and students at the Charleston School of Law are scheduled to discuss a new development in the case of a black teenager electrocuted more than 70 years ago for the killings of two white girls in a segregated South Carolina mill town.

A news release says school president Ed Bell, faculty and students are slated to discuss the case Friday.

George Stinney was 14 when he was arrested, convicted of murder in a one-day trial and executed in 1944 – all in the span of about three months and without an appeal.

A state judge in 2014 tossed out the conviction saying a grave injustice had been done. Miller Shealy, a faculty member at the law school, worked with Stinney’s family to get the conviction overturned.

 

 

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