Monday, October 20, 2014
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The first African story with a cast of Africans and sponsored by Africans

NEW YORK---Acclaimed Nigerian born filmmaker Jeta Amata told the assembly at the United Nations, “This is the first time an African story with a cast of Africans and sponsored by Africans is being told by Africans, ” and thus the powerful political thriller ‘Black November’ screened before a capacity audience of more than 400 that included international and American dignitaries along with entertainment giants Warner Brothers and Viacom.

Screened during the same week President Barack Obama, Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe addressed a world body at the General Assembly, Amata was joined by Nigerians such as executive producer Captain Hosa Okunbo, lead actress Mbong Amata, co-stars Haitian-American singer/producer Wyclef Jean, Senegalese-American rapper/singer Akon, activist Al Sharpton and legendary promoter Don King.

Illinois Congressman Bobby Rush and Houston Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee co-hosted the event on the heels of screenings at the Library of Congress and the Kennedy Center. After first hosting the film at the prestigious Library of Congress and a subsequent special screening at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. the legislators sponsored a Resolution that if passed would begin the process of cleaning up the Niger Delta for which the film advocates.

Amata poured his heart and soul into the most compelling  ‘Black November” which introduced the plight of the Niger Delta to the United States of America in 2012.

This pulsating, heart-stopping feature film which featured a collage of American and Nigerian actors, staring Oscar nominated Mickey Rourke, Oscar winner Kim Bassinger, Mbong Amata, Enyinna Nwigwe, and Sarah Wayne Callies brings to screen the ongoing struggle, neglect and torment of the Niger Delta.  

Nigerian’s new government regime will require the support of the America to repair the damage caused 50 years of oil spills.  

The film carefully weaves the horrific crimes against humanity, with the greed of its underserved population and paints an vivid portrait of the Niger Delta that is a must see film for the world. 

‘Black November” reveals the injustice and environmental devastation of Niger Delta to the Western World, while garnering a bevy of new champions who are campaigning to heal its infrastructure.

 

Another screening of the film during the Offshore Technology Conference in Houston brought out yet another passionate audience for an event hosted by Rep. Jackson-Lee.

Nigeria is the fifth largest supplier of crude oil in the world, and American purchases an estimated 20 percent of its oil from Nigeria. That means Americans are impacted because they drive vehicles using oil from Nigeria. Oil is at the root of the tragic tale.

“One out of three Americans use Nigeria’s oil, every single day,” filmmaker Amata said.

The film details for many, the death and destruction caused by neglected pipe lines owned by oil companies from the United States, a criminal cartel that followed the orders of a military coup depicted ruling the West African nation.

However, the oil-polluted region of the Niger Delta remains the primary focus of  ‘Black November’ director Amata and executive producer Okunbo, both sons of the region.

Based on a true and ongoing story of 50 years of continuous oil spills in one area, the ‘Black November’ storyline follows Mbong Amata who portrays Ebierre, a western-educated Nigerian who returns to her village and emerges an influential influence on the community.

In a performance that is sure to garner Mbong rave Hollywood reviews, she portrays a rare Nigerian heroine who takes on powerful oil companies and a corrupt government to benefit her beloved people in a riveting storyline of resistance, hope and love.

Director Amata weaves real life tragedy with Hollywood dramatics to feature Mickey Rourke, Kim Bassinger, Anne Heche and Vivica Fox as accessories to a plot that captures its audience attention and emotion. Akon and Jean portray rebel leaders.

Vivid scenes of political strife, death squads, alleged accidents and militancy were filmed in Nigeria and Hollywood to dramatize the urgency of the problem.

Magnified in high definition for the world to ponder, “Black November” reveals the plight of thousands of citizens who have died.

The film spotlights the travesty surrounding corporate investments in oil in the Niger Delta region of Africa and exposes in a powerful manner the exploitation of a people.

“Black life must have value,” Sharpton said. He added, “the blood that binds us together can not divide us by the water that separates us.”

As the film gears for a United States and international release, it has begun documentary screening tours at colleges throughout the nation, which educates students to the Niger Delta plight.

A recent five college tour which began at Cornell University and New York University, and resumed in Washington DC at John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, Coppin State University in Baltimore and George Washington University jump started the grassroots movement.

More information can be obtained at www.blacknovemberthemovement.com

Vinette K. Pryce contributed to this story

 

 

 

Category: Movies




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