Monday, September 22, 2014
FOLLOW US: 

    

Don Newcombe in a familiar stance.

 

Don Newcombe, the Dodger

 

Award was presented by Dodger All-Star Matt Kemp as a part of Delta Civil Rights Game Weekend.  

                

LOS ANGELES – Former Dodger pitcher and current Special Advisor to the Chairman Don Newcombe was  presented with Major League Baseball’s Beacon of Hope Award at the MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon presented by Belk at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta. Newcombe was honored along with the founding members of Earth, Wind & Fire, who received the Beacon of Change Award, and Congressman John Lewis, who received the Beacon of Life Award.

“It's quite an appreciated honor and I am so happy to join all the former recipients of this prestigious award,” said Newcombe. “Surely, my thanks go out to my Los Angeles Dodgers, Commissioner Bud Selig and the selection committee for making it all possible.”

Newcombe is one of only two players in baseball history to win the Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player and Cy Young Awards, and also played alongside Hall of Famers Roy Campanella, Larry Doby and Jackie Robinson as the first African American pitcher in a Major League All-Star Game (1949).

Dodger center fielder Matt Kemp presented Newcombe with the award and many Dodger guests were in attendance at the luncheon, including Chairman and Owner Mark Walter, team President and CEO Stan Kasten, Owner Bobby Patton, executive Vice President Bob Wolfe, Dodger General Manager Ned Colletti, Dodger Manager Don Mattingly, coaches Trey Hillman, Davey Lopes, Ken Howell, and Manny Mota, players Andre Ethier, Hanley Ramirez and James Loney and broadcasters Rick Monday and Charley Steiner.

The MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon was one of many events that were held in the Atlanta area as a part of Delta Civil Rights Game Weekend, which included the Civil Rights Game between the Dodgers and Braves.   

The 2012 Delta Civil Rights Game and ancillary activities is the sixth installation of an annual event that began in Memphis in 2007, centering on an exhibition game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Cleveland Indians. After another exhibition game in Memphis in 2008, the Civil Rights Game and ancillary events moved to Cincinnati in 2009 and 2010 and Atlanta in 2011 as regular season contests. As home to many key leaders and organizations of the civil rights movement, and as a location for many of the movement’s grassroots activities, Atlanta played a critical role in this period of American history.

The Los Angeles Dodgers, pioneers in sport and world culture, have won more games than any other club in the National League since moving to Los Angeles in 1958.  Since the start of the modern era in baseball, the Dodgers of Brooklyn and Los Angeles, combined, have won six World Series titles and 21 National League pennants with a cumulative attendance of more than 190 million, the highest total in the history of baseball or any other sport.

.  

 

Category: Baseball


 

Slideshows





Click to
Win!