Wednesday, October 22, 2014
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Now I can understand wanting to keep your distance from the police. Not a problem, I know there continues to be questionable issues with the police and Blacks. But I draw the line at using a "code of ethics" as a reason to not alert the police about a possible serial killer next door.

Rap star Cam'ron says there's no situation--including a serial killer living next door--that would cause him to help police in any way, because to do so would hurt his music sales and violate his "code of ethics."

Cam'ron, who was born as Cameron Giles, made this statement while talking to Anderson Cooper for a CBS 60 Minutes report on how the hip-hop culture's message to shun the police has undermined efforts to solve murders across the country.

In his own words...

"If I knew the serial killer was living next door to me? I wouldn't call and tell anybody on him--but I'd probably move. But I'm not going to call and be like, 'The serial killer's in 4E.' "

We just say some stupid things sometimes.

Now look, don't get me wrong. I am Black and I completely understand the issues some of us have with the police. I say some of us, because there are those of us who don' have issues with the police and we can't take for granted that all Black people hate the police.

But it's one thing to clam up for fear of being targeted for snitching, but it's a completely different thing when your excuse is for a so-called "code of ethics." Brotha please.

What code of the ethics?

Is this the same code of ethics that women are hos and bitches and brothas are niggas? Is this the same code that makes brotha and sistas fight over the colors blue and red? Is this the same code that keeps crack in our neighborhoods?

In my opinion, Cam'ron just made all brothas in the hood look absolutely, stupid. And I said brothas in the hood because that's who he is representing, not me. You all.

For all of the police brutality and racial profiling of Blacks that occurs at the hands of the police, please now that I am perfectly aware that if something goes down on my block, it's not the local gangstas that I'd be calling for help, because the truth of the matter is they are probably the reason why something's going down in the first place. No, it's going to the L.A.P.D. Yes. I am calling the L.A.P.D.

Yes, I'm going to call them. In fact, I have the lead officer for my neighborhood on speed dial. I sure do. My disdain for the police brutality and racial profiling done by the L.A.P.D. is not going to keep me from calling on them when my life or someone else's life is in danger. Now I may call anonymously, but I'm still going to call. And quite frankly, I think that's the attitude of a lot of us have that live in the hood, and not Cam'ron's sorry excuse of a street code of ethics.

Given some of Cam'ron's lyrics, that code is questionable anyway.

It just drives me up the wall when we allow ourselves to go on national television for White folks, because I have to tell you CBS's 60 Minutes isn't getting its high ratings from young Black men 18-34 in the inner city watching. He didn't earn any street credibility with Whites 54 and over who for the most part don't even listen to his music.

Cam'ron needs to get a clue and his publicist should be fired for allowing him to make an ass of himself on national television at the expense of Black people.

As if we don't have enough problems.

About Ms. Cannick
At 29, Jasmyne A. Cannick is a social and political commentator/critic who addresses social, cultural, and race issues and is based in Los Angeles. She can be reached via her website at www.jasmynecannick.com or www.myspace.com/jasmynecannick.





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