Friday, October 24, 2014
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In-keeping with the “unconventional-ness” of his campaign, Senator Barack Obama has scheduled an open-air event at Investco Field, in Denver, Colorado, next month where he will accept the Democratic Party’s nomination to be the next President of the United States. The event is expected to attract approximately 75,000 people and Obama has made it clear that this will be the people’s convention.

According to a statement from the campaign headquarters, “On Thursday, August 28th, he’s scheduled to formally accept the Democratic nomination in a speech at the convention hall in front of the assembled delegates.”

Meanwhile on the campaign trail, it is business as usual between Obama and Senator John McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee.

As the economic situation in the country worsens, each candidate is placing his plan to battle the economic woes of the masses of the people. The economy has overtaken Iraq, healthcare and energy as the nation’s number one priority. However, the $12 billion per month being spent on the misguided war, if re-directed domestically, will alleviate much of the country’s economic burdens, if not all of it.

In a recent news report focusing on the Obama plan, some economists claim that the numbers—in his agenda—do not make sense. But it seems rather strange that the experts who are saying the way Obama plans to pay for it would not work, they are not focusing on what the impact of the re-direction of $12 billion per month will do—and that is a part of the Obama plan. The immediacy of the mortgage crisis, rising energy costs, healthcare, food and education appears to cloud many of the people’s visions of the wasteful spending and the financial drain that is attached to the Iraq invasion.

There are several different versions of how and when the occupation of Iraq will end but no one disagrees that doing so will generate substantial savings that can be used domestically. And even as some experts suggest, that rebuilding Iraq and Afghanistan will have to be factored into the equation, without wars raging, those countries will be able to help themselves to some degree. Iraq reportedly sits on the second largest oil reserve in the world that ought to count for something.

But the McCain plan seems to focus on staying the course in Iraq and as the erstwhile Senator has compared the future of Iraq—under his watch—to the status of Germany and Japan since the end of World War II; and South Korea since the end of the Korean War, as his ideal for Iraq.

Both candidates have modified their positions on issues and have altered their stances when it seemed prudent to do so for any number of valid reasons. According to some experts, it shows strong leadership qualities to be able to change, as circumstances mandate and it also shows shallow thinking when a leader cannot change even when change is warranted. The current administration’s stay-the-course in Iraq is a perfect example of that kind of thinking. And despite the tepid gains that resulted from the so-called surge, the decrease in violence, in no way, diminishes the enormity of the fiasco.

McCain’s alignment primarily with the failed policies of the current administration—military, economic and energy—screams for the change that has been the flagship of the Obama campaign.

 

Category: Campaign Watch


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