Monday, July 28, 2014
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Angela Robinson is bringing Broadway to Hollywood


Angela_Robinson
Angela Robinson



By Sam Johnson
Sentinel Intern

Interview with Angela Robinson

Angela Robinson, a native of San Francisco, CA is in preparation for one of her most beloved classics The Color Purple of which she will be playing Shug Avery alongside Fantasia Barrino and LaToya London for the February run of The Color Purple in Los Angeles at the Pantages Theater.

Robinson, a student of theater, television and film is a graduate of Brown University and New York University. Her film credits include Chickula: Teenage Vampire (1995), D.E.B.S. (2003-2004), Herbie: Fully Loaded (2005) The L Word (2006) and Fabulous! The Story of Queer Cinema (2006).

Angela has a strong background in theater of which she has played various roles from The Wizard of Oz and Dreamgirls to her touring days with Regional Baltimore Center Stage, The Pittsburgh Public and The Alliance Theater. She has also respectively made cameo appearance in Law & Order, A Diva's Christmas Carol, Bye Bye Birdie and Pajama Game. Robinson, a lover of theater was thrilled to share her experience, character relationship, and other views about The Color Purple.

Sentinel: What is your connection with your character Shug and what character traits do she posses that you identify with?

AR: She was not afraid to speak her mind. She didn't have any fear of any man and didn't have to fight like Sophia; her presence was strong enough. She was extremely spiritual woman who was doing a different thing with her life at the time and preferred to avoid hypocrisy at all cost. She was an honest person, a great friend and a fighter.

Sentinel: How would you say the play differs from the movie?

AR: The play explains the story more in dept. We get to see different background. The musical is closer to the book. The movie was good but it can never really expose all of the details like the book.

Sentinel: Do you think there will ever be another Color Purple?

AR: I hope so. We shouldn't have one thing and move on. If we continue to write our stories and we come out support them and see the productions. There should be plenty more, music, books, movies. It's a piece of art that open the door for Broadway.

Sentinel: What do you think critics/audiences will remember most about the Color Purple after it has finally wrapped on Broadway once and for all?

AR: How they felt when they saw it. When it's in the theater vault people will remember how they felt when they saw it. It could be inspiration, motivation, love, hope or joy. I hope that these feelings will always be with them when they think of The Color Purple.

Sentinel: The Color Purple, Dreamgirls, Lion King and The Wiz have all had such great runs on Broadway. In your opinion what is about these pieces that keeps audiences coming back?

AR: The key to art is what keeps audiences coming back. Art is something that should last forever. When you write a song and paint you should always strive to create something that will stand the test of time. The plays are all unique and just great bodies of work that people really worked hard to develop. The art has changed people. It's inspired people and most of all it last. 

Sentinel: Remakes are extremely popular in Hollywood right now. How would you feel about a remake of The Color Purple?

AR: It's rumored that they're going to do a movie musical and I would love to be involved.

Category: Theater


 

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